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[02] HOW DO I CONFIGURE MY ENVIRONMENT SETTINGS AT LOGIN?

     This file (.profile) is already setup for you with some generic defaults.
     In the file you will find information on customizing your session.  You
     can edit the file directly using an editor (emacs, ed, vi or pico).  Note
     that any changes to the file effect future login sessions.

     --- UNIX Shell HACKS ---

     If you are using the UNIX Bourne Shell or Korn Shell, you need to
     be aware of the ".profile" file in your home directory.  This acts
     as an init file by setting up various environment variables and
     such.  If a ".kshrc" file is present and you are using the Korn
     Shell, then those variables, functions and aliases will also be
     loaded.

     [ ENV SETTINGS ]

     A typical .profile looks much like this:

         MAIL=/usr/mail/$LOGNAME
         TERM=vt100
         LINES=24
         COLUMNS=80
         EDITOR=/bin/ed
         VISUAL=/usr/bin/vi
         HZ=60

         PS1="$ "
         PS2="> "

         stty erase '^h' intr '^c' echoe

         export MAIL TERM LINES COLUMNS EDITOR VISUAL HZ

     For both the Bourne and Korn shells, the default for PS1 is "$".
     If you'd rather have the current directory for your prompt, here
     is a ksh hack to do it.  Put this function in your .kshrc file.

         chdir ()
         {
            \cd ${*:-$HOME} ** PS1="$(pwd)> "
         }

         alias cd=chdir

     Another way of doing this without defining a function and alias
     would be a hack on the PS1 environment variable itself:

         PS1=['$?:${PWD#${PWD%/*/*/*}/}> '

     This hack also gives you the return code for the last command executed.

     For the novice user, both of these are useful.  Being able to make
     aliases like:

          alias dir=ls -xsFb

     make using UNIX a little bit easier.

     To get a list of processes currently being run by your userid, type:

          ps -U $LOGNAME
    
     If you have a process running that you wish to terminate (but don't
     have a TTY associated with it) get the pid, then use the kill command:

          kill -HUP      (other signals include -9)

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